The Catholic University of America

Course Descriptions

Electrical Engineering (EE)

To view the complete schedule of courses for
each semester, go to Cardinal Station.

EE 311: Signals and Systems

3.00 Credits

Techniques for analysis and synthesis of signals, both continuous and discrete. Engineering applications involving simple design problems. Mathematical modeling methods for both continuous and discrete time systems. Techniques include the Fourier Series, Fourier and Laplace Transforms. Computer-aided design methods used to obtain hands-on experience in analysis and simulation. Prerequisite: ENGR 212.

EE 312: Microprocessor Programming and Design

3.00 Credits

This course presents the fundamentals of microprocessor architecture and interfacing. Topics include instruction set architecture, C/C++ language, debugging and IO device interfacing techniques. The PIC processor architecture will be studied, utilizing windows based integrated development environment and tools suite. A PIC hardware evaluation board is used as the basis for interfacing experiments. Software will be written in C/C++ language. The Pentium processor architecture and the PCI bus will be studied. A hardware/software project will be assigned towards the end of the course. The course is 50% lab and 50% lecture. Prerequisite:

EE 322: Electronic Circuits II

3.00 Credits

Study of feedback, the analysis, design, and applications of operational amplifiers, oscillators, multivibrators, wideband amplifiers, tuned amplifiers, and power amplifiers. Prerequisites: ENGR 321.

EE 326: Switching Circuits and Logic Design

3.00 Credits

Analysis and design of digital circuits, number systems, combinational and sequential circuits. Basic computer arithmetic, applications and implementation of logic design. Prerequisite: CSC327 (Co-req)

EE 327: Switching Circuits and Logic Design Laboratory

1.00 Credits

This laboratory course is meant for students in an introductory digital electronics course that emphasizes logic circuit analysis, applications, and design. The lab work consists of circuit projects that range from investigating basic logic concepts to synthesizing circuits for new applications. Most digital design projects will be implemented using complex programmable logic devices (CPLDs) and/or field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The projects are intended to challenge students and to provide them with directed laboratory experience that develops insight into digital principles, applications, and techniques of logic circuit analysis and design. Prerequisites: CSC 326 (co-req)

EE 342: Electromagnetic Fields and Waves

3.00 Credits

Theory and application of electromagnetic waves. Maxwell's equations in vector differential form introduced; solutions to the wave equation for bounded and unbounded cases examined. The rectangular waveguide and the transmission line are studied. Radiation from simple geometrics included. Prerequisites: ENGR 222, PHYS 216.

EE 356: Electrical Laboratory II

2.00 Credits

Correlated sequence of laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the theory of junior-level electrical engineering courses, including active filters, nonlinear applications of operational amplifiers, switching and logic circuits, digital system design, push-pull amplifiers, oscillators, A/D and D/A converters, signal processing and digital filters. Prerequisites: ENGR 355

EE 357: Electromag Laboratory

1.00 Credits

This laboratory course is offered in conjunction with the junior level courses on Electromagnetic Fields and Waves (EE342) and Analog and Digital Signal Processing (EE362). The electromagnetic component of the lab covers experiments related to the basic concepts, fundamental principles of antennas and electromagnetic fields. The signal processing component covers experiments related to techniques for analysis and synthesis of signals and includes techniques such as the Fourier series, Fourier and Laplace transforms digital filter design. Computer-aided design methods will be used to obtain hands-on experience in analysis and simulation. Prerequisite: In conjunction with EE342 Prerequisite: EE326, ENGR 355

EE 362: Analog and Digital Signal Processing

3.00 Credits

Analysis and synthesis of analog and digital filters. Laplace and Fourier analysis used in analog filter design, with z-transform analysis in digital filter design. Fundamentals of digital signal processing, relevant to digital filtering. Computer-aided design and simulation. Prerequisite: EE 311.

EE 404: Solid State Devices

3.00 Credits

Electronic properties of materials including conductivity, dielectric and magnetic permittivity. Semiconductor theory with emphasis on junction devices. Introduction to semiconductor lasers. Prerequisite: EE 342.

EE 406: Advance Digital Logic Design

3.00 Credits

Analysis and design of advanced digital circuits such synchronous and asynchronous sequential circuits. Advanced computer arithmetic hardware and introduction to the design of micro-architecture hardware and performance concepts such as pipelining. The course also includes projects for the applications and implementation of digital logic design using programmable logic devices (PLDs) and/or field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) for rapid prototyping.

EE 413: Communication Systems and Networks

3.00 Credits

(3) Lecture. This course deals with fundamental concepts of communication systems and networks. More specifically it covers the following topics: Concept of signals in the time and frequency domains. Digital communication Systems: Pulse Code Modulation (PCM), delta modulation and differential PCM, multiplexing and wave shaping. Modulation techniques: analog AM, FM, and PM schemes. Digital modulation schemes: On-Off Keying, Frequency Shift Keying and Phase Shift Keying, Optical Modulation Schemes. Computer communication networks: Local Area Networks , Performance of communication systems and networks: Noise considerations. Probability of Error, delay and throughput Concepts. Prerequisite: EE 311

EE 415: Control Systems Analysis and Synthesis

3.00 Credits

Mathematical modelling of linear systems, state-variable, time-domain, and frequency-domain analysis of control systems. Root locus, Bode diagram, and Nyquist criterion. Stability and Routh Hurwitz method. Computer control system analysis and design. Z-transform and Z-transfer function. Prerequisites: EE 311

EE 416: Power Systems

3.00 Credits

This is an introductory course in the field of electric power systems and electromechanical energy conversion. This course discusses not only traditional power systems but also new uses for electric power in transportation systems. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy for industrial as well as military applications. Electric power systems is an indispensable tool for alternative energy systems, including wind and solar, geothermal and their integration with the power grid. Prerequisite: ENGR 212, EE 321/322, EE 342.

EE 420: Hybrid Gas/Electric Vehicles

3.00 Credits

This course will cover the basic theory and engineering in modern hybrid gas/electric vehicles. Topics will include hybrid drive trains, regenerative braking, electrical energy storage, fuel efficiency calculations, performance metrics, the economics of hybrid vehicles, future design of automobiles, including 'plug-in' electric vehicles, hydrogen powered vehicles, and fuel cells. This course will dedicate a few weeks exclusively to the Toyota Prius, covering not only the design and engineering of the Prius, but also the social and economic impact of this particular hybrid vehicle. Prerequisites ENGR 321

EE 421: Programmable Logic Devices and HDL Design

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 422: Mixed Signal VLSI Design

3.00 Credits

Design of very large scale electronic circuits, including layout, circuit analysis and component selection, extensive use of SPICE and circuit layout CAD tools. Following current industry paradigms, the class emulates a design house, where chips are completely designed and thoroughly simulated prior to their fabrication in a foundry.

EE 426: Computer and Network Security

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce the application of cryptographic concepts in the practical implementation of network security practices and techniques. The issues here are: What are the risks and vulnerabilities of computer, Internet, and multimedia data? What are the countermeasures to fight these back? How does cryptographic technique enforce protection? What is digital signature? What is steganography and how is it used for authentication and counterfeit detection? What the different network security technologies are as applied to electronic mail, e-commerce, web transaction, and IP networks? Prerequisite: CSC 323

EE 427: Fundamentals of Neural Networks

3.00 Credits

Introduces basic concepts of neural networks using the general framework of parallel distributed processing. Deals with architecture, principles of operation, training algorithms and applications of a number of neural networks. Each part of the course includes computer exercises using MATLAB performed by the student to demonstrate and reinforce the concepts learned in the class.

EE 431: Data Communication Networks

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 434: Communication and Computer Network Simulation

3.00 Credits

Deals with simulation modeling and performance evaluation of communication networks. Presents simulation of network elements and overall networks. Simulated network elements include point-to-point, multicast and broadcast links, satellite and radio links, queueing systems, and circuit and packet switches. Simulated overall networks include Local Area Networks (LAN), packet switched (X.25) networks, and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) based Broadband Integrated Services Digital Networks (BISDN), mobile radio and packet video networks. Development of simulation models for audio and video traffic sources and flow and congestion control algorithms. Discussion of methods of presentation, analysis, and interpretation of simulation outputs. Course will use OPNET software packages to provide hands-on experience. Prerequisite: EE 413 or permission of instructor.

EE 436: Distributed Computing and Networking

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 441: Electromagnetic Theory

3.00 Credits

Theory of electromagnetic field equations and their application to wave propagation in waveguides and resonant structures. Discussion includes partially filled waveguides, corrugated guide, and other structures. Prerequisite: EE 342 or equivalent.

EE 443: Introduction to Remote Sensing and Imaging Applications

3.00 Credits

This course addresses the theory and principles of passive and active remote sensing at different frequencies. The course emphasis is on electromagnetic phenomena rather than image processing techniques for the remotely captured data. Topics include wave propagation and scattering from targets and natural surfaces, basic antenna systems, radiometry and the radar equation. Effects of different media and boundaries such as rough surfaces on wave characteristics (e.g. dispersion, reflection, refraction, attenuation) are discussed. Prerequisite: EE342

EE 445: Basics of Computational Electromagnetics

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to provide undergraduate/graduate students in electrical en- gineering, with special interest in subject areas related to antennas, radar, and electromagnetic compatibility studies, necessary computational skills and tools useful in their professional career.

EE 446: Basics of Time Domain Electromagnetics

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 447: Artificial Intelligence

3.00 Credits

(Formerly 542) Topics may include state space search, heuristic search, knowledge representation techniques, expert systems, automated reasoning, definitions of intelligence, computer problem solving, game playing, pattern recognition, theorem proving, semantic information, processing, evolutionary systems, and heuristic programming. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

EE 457: Communications Laboratory

1.00 Credits

A correlated sequence of laboratory experiments designed to illustrate the theory of senior level communication courses including sampling and analog to digital conversion, analog and digital amplitude, frequency and phase modulation and demodulation schemes, analog and digital fiber optic link design and architectures and protocols of local area networks. Prerequisite: EE 357 Co-requisite: EE 413

EE 459: Introduction to Wind Energy Technology

3.00 Credits

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding wind power, focusing first on the evolution of the technology and reviewing basic technical principles associated with wind turbines and their operation. There will also be an explanation of the electric industry context within which wind technology must operate and the challenges associated with integrating a variable resource such as wind into the utility industry's resource mix. The course will review the impacts and effectiveness of renewable energy policy in the U.S. over the past few decades, and will explore the economics of wind as well as the basics of the industry's structure and operations. Finally, the course will explore the potential for wind power in the U.S., as well as the barriers or constraints to achieving that potential. Prereqs: ENGR321

EE 460: Photovoltaics

3.00 Credits

This course covers a variety of topics related to solar photovoltaic devices, solar panels, and the generation of electrical energy form light. The course will concentrate on traditional silicon-based solar panels, with some discussion late in the semester about newer, more efficient types of solar cells. The course also covers some of the electrical and electronic hardware commonly included in photovoltaic systems, such as charge controllers, batteries, and inverters. Prerequisites: ENGR321 or Permission

EE 461: Random Signal Theory

3.00 Credits

Mathematical techniques for analysis and measurement of random signals and processes needed as a foundation for work in radar/sonar, communication theory, or detection, and estimation. Probability; random variables; correlation functions and power spectra stationarity, ergodicity; linear and nonlinear systems with random inputs. Prerequisite: MATH 309.

EE 462: Introduction to Electric Power

3.00 Credits

EE 462: Intro to Electric Power This course will provide a basic understanding of electric power systems, including the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity. Topics will include basic AC system analysis, complex loads and power, quality factor, three phase systems, system stability, and power flow. The material presented will be approached within the contexts of the traditional power grid as well as touching upon the benefits and challenges presented by emerging alternative energy technologies.

EE 472: Basics of Information Coding and Transmission

3.00 Credits

Introduces the basic notions of quantifying information content using entropy, and establishes lower bounds on file sizes for data compression. Covers commonly used compression methods (Huffman, Lempel-Ziv, etc). Introduces the notion of channel capacity for storage and transmission, and provides an introduction to error correction coding and its role in reliable transmission and storage over error-prone channels

EE 491A: Engineering Practice and Design I

2.00 Credits

Two-semester sequence teaches the tools of the engineering profession, including project organization, application of engineering design standards, technical writing, and effective presentation. First semester: researching the problem, learning design fundamentals and procedures, and refining written and oral communication skills. Second semester: implementation and detailed investigation of engineering design and tradeoffs. Prerequisite: Senior engineering status.

EE 491B: Engineering Practice and Design II

3.00 Credits

Two-semester sequence teaches the tools of the engineering profession, including project organization, application of engineering design standards, technical writing, and effective presentation. First semester: researching the problem, learning design fundamentals and procedures, and refining written and oral communication skills. Second semester: implementation and detailed investigation of engineering design and tradeoffs. Prerequisite: Senior engineering status. Prerequisite: EE491

EE 502: Optical Systems and Devices

3.00 Credits

In recent years, photonics has found increasing applications in areas such as communications, image processing, sensing and displays. The objective of this course is to provide a thorough survey of this rapidly expanding and important area of electrical engineering. This course will cover the primary theories of light including ray, wave, electromagnetic and photon optics, as well as the interaction of light with matter, and the theory of semiconducting materials and their optical properties. Practical applications of photonics such as imaging systems, holography, fiber optics, laser and detectors will be covered.

EE 504: Introduction to Fourier Optics

3.00 Credits

Students will be introduced to the principles of linear systems and Fourier theory applied to the analysis of optical propagation, diffraction, coherent and incoherent image formation. Topics will include two-dimensional signals and systems, diffraction theory, and the simplifying approximations to diffraction in the Fresnel and Fraunhofer regimes. Transforming properties of lenses will be studied along with the concepts of spatial filtering and aperture coding in image formation. Prerequisites: EE342

EE 514: Introduction to Hardware Accelerated Computing

3.00 Credits

The past few years the High Performance Computing (HPC) community has witnessed a surge in the use of hardware acceleration, such as graphics processor units (GPU), field programmable gate arrays (FPGA), digital signal processors (DSP), cell processors, etc. This coincides at a time when conventional microprocessors are unable to keep up with Moore's Law, and become costly due to their increasing power requirements. This course is an introduction to hardware accelerated computational techniques and provides an introduction to FPGA and GPU-programming. Students are expected to have a strong understanding of programming in C, C++ or equivalent programming language. This course will enable students develop a solid understanding of the interaction between software and hardware, and gain hand-on experience in high performance computing.

EE 515: Advanced Digital Signal Processing

3.00 Credits

This course examines the properties of signals and systems, sampling, data acquisition, Discrete-Time Fourier Transform (DTFT), Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), Z-transform theory, spectral analysis, digital filter design and discrete transforms. Practical applications of digital signal processing will be emphasized with a number of hands on MATLAB Programming exercises.

EE 516: Power Systems

3.00 Credits

This is an introductory course in the field of electric power systems and electromechanical energy conversion. This course discusses not only traditional power systems but also new uses for electric power in transportation systems. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy for industrial as well as military applications. Electric power systems is an indispensable tool for alternative energy systems, including wind and solar, geothermal and their integration with the power grid. Prerequisite: ENGR 212, EE 321/322, EE 342.

EE 519: Digital System Design

3.00 Credits

Comprises both lectures and labs, introduces the most important aspects of real-world digital design. Emphasis on practical, hands-on experience in building a system of medium complexity. Design synthesis highlights modern ASIC devices. Staff.

EE 521: Programmable Logic Devices and HDL Design

3.00 Credits

This course covers the concepts, structure and programming characteristics of programmable logic devices (PLDs) such as Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Hardware Description Languages (HDLs) are used to create designs that are tested on FPGA devices. In this course, students will learn how to design and implement general-purpose hardware components, such as computer arithmetic units and microprocessor data/control paths. Students will also learn how to design specialized hardware from different fields such as digital signal and image processing using techniques that are based on high-level environments, such as Matlab and Simulink, targeting FPGA devices. Pre-requisites EE / CSC 326 or instructor's permission.

EE 522: Linear System Analysis

3.00 Credits

Basic concepts in linear systems; linear spaces and linear operators; state variable approach; observability and controllability of continuous systems; stability of linear systems; design of state feedback, state estimators, and compensators. Analysis and design of composite systems.

EE 524: Secure Programming

3.00 Credits

Introduction to Software Security, risk assessment, buffer overflows, design for security, security testing and auditing, security issues of open source and closed source software, guiding principles of software security, selection of appropriate technologies, access control, race conditions, trust management, input validation, and database security. Pre-req: CSC123

EE 526: Computer and Network Security

3.00 Credits

This course will introduce the application of cryptographic concepts in the practical implementation of network security practices and techniques. The issues here are: What are the risks and vulnerabilities of computer, Internet, and multimedia data? What are the countermeasures to fight these back? How does cryptographic technique enforce protection? What is digital signature? What is steganography and how is it used for authentication and counterfeit detection? What the different network security technologies are as applied to electronic mail, e-commerce, web transaction, and IP networks? Prerequisite: CSC 323

EE 527: Fundamentals of Neural Networks

3.00 Credits

Introduces basic concepts of neural networks using the general framework of parallel distributed processing. Deals with architecture, principles of operation, training algorithms and applications of a number of neural networks. Each part of the course includes computer exercises using MATLAB performed by the student to demonstrate and reinforce the concepts learned in the class.

EE 530: Parallel and Heterogeneous Computing

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of parallel computation. Topics chosen for discussion will show students how to develop effective parallel programs with MPI, Pthreads, and OpenMP. An Introduction to Parallel Programming explains how to design, debug, and evaluate the performance of distributed and shared-memory programs. Parallel algorithm design and analysis as well as parallel programming languages will be examined in the context of specific parallel systems and models.

EE 531: Data Communications Networks

3.00 Credits

This course deals with basic principles of networking. More specifically it covers the following topics: Network Architectures and Protocols. OSI model and TCP/IP protocol suite. Transmission media. Protocols at the physical, data link, network and transport layers. Multiplexing, error and congestion control. Circuit and packet switching. Local and metropolitan area networks. ATM and frame relay. Network security and distributed applications. Prerequisite: EE 413 or equivalent.

EE 534: Communication and Computer Network Simulation

3.00 Credits

Deals with simulation modeling and performance evaluation of communication networks. Presents simulation of network elements and overall networks. Simulated network elements include point-to-point, multicast and broadcast links, satellite and radio links, queueing systems, and circuit and packet switches. Simulated overall networks include Local Area Networks (LAN), packet switched (X.25) networks, and Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) based Broadband Integrated Services Digital Networks (BISDN), mobile radio and packet video networks. Development of simulation models for audio and video traffic sources and flow and congestion control algorithms. Discussion of methods of presentation, analysis, and interpretation of simulation outputs. Course will use OPNET software packages to provide hands-on experience. Prerequisite: EE 413 or permission of instructor.

EE 536: Distributed Computing and Networking

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 540: Introduction to Antenna Systems

3.00 Credits

A review of electromagnetics is given with an emphasis on concepts needed for antenna theory (i.e., Vector Potentials, Free Space Green's functions, etc.). Basic concepts such as directivity, gain, bandwidth, beamwidth, polarization, and aperture size are defined and discussed. Antennas are presented from a circuit theory perspective. Case studies of dipole and loop antennas are developed to illustrate the analytical techniques. Radiation from apertures is also presented. Antenna arrays are treated and basic concepts such as scanning, amplitude distributions, grating lobes, and beam squint are introduced. The uniform and binomial distributions are treated in depth. The course concludes with a discussion of measurement techniques. Prerequisite: EE342

EE 541: Electromagnetic Theory

3.00 Credits

Theory of electromagnetic field equations and their application to wave propagation in waveguides and resonant structures. Discussion includes partially filled waveguides, corrugated guide, and other structures. Prerequisite: EE 342 or equivalent.

EE 542: Antennas and Propagation for Wireless Communications

3.00 Credits

This course addresses issues related to wireless communications from a perspective of antennas and propagation. The electromagnetic theory and communications components of wireless communication systems are linked together for analyzing and designing such systems. The important role of antennas in setting up cellular communication systems is studied and critical propagation issues in the design of such systems are presented. Topics that will be discussed in the course include cellular communications history and principles, basic concepts in electromagnetic wave theory, reflection, transmission and polarization, antennas and radiation, Fresnel Theory, line-of-sight, models for radio propagation, flat earth, terrain roughness, diffraction theory, propagation in presence of buildings, fading, diversity, link budgets, system design issues. Prerequisite: EE 342.

EE 543: Intro to Remote Sensing and Imaging Applications

3.00 Credits

This course addresses the theory and principles of passive and active remote sensing at different frequencies. The course emphasis is on electromagnetic phenomena rather than image processing techniques for the remotely captured data. Topics include wave propagation and scattering from targets and natural surfaces, basic antenna systems, radiometry and the radar equation. Effects of different media and boundaries such as rough surfaces on wave characteristics (e.g. dispersion, reflection, refraction, attenuation) are discussed. Prerequisite: EE342

EE 544: RF and Microwave Circuits

3.00 Credits

This course is an introduction to the analysis and design of RF and microwave circuits from the perspective of distributed circuit theory. Fundamental concepts of impedance matching, network theory, S-parameters, coupled line theory, and system noise are discussed in relation to the design of passive and active components used in wireless communication circuits and mixed-signal circuits. Topics covered in the course include transmission lines, impedance matching, filters, power dividers, couplers, resonators, oscillators, mixers, active microwave transistor amplifiers, and design techniques for optimizing system gain, bandwidth, noise figure, and input/output impedance. Industry-standard microwave CAD tools will be used to analyze and design circuits. Students will fabricate several circuits in planar microstrip and learn how to characterize circuit performance on network/spectrum analyzer instruments to complete the design learning cycle. Prerequisites: EE342 or equivalent

EE 545: Basics of Computational Electromagnetics

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to provide undergraduate/graduate students in electrical en- gineering, with special interest in subject areas related to antennas, radar, and electromagnetic compatibility studies, necessary computational skills and tools useful in their professional career.

EE 546: Basics of Time Domain Electromagnetics

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 547: Artificial Intelligence

3.00 Credits

(Formerly 542) Topics may include state space search, heuristic search, knowledge representation techniques, expert systems, automated reasoning, definitions of intelligence, computer problem solving, game playing, pattern recognition, theorem proving, semantic information, processing, evolutionary systems, and heuristic programming. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

EE 548: Optical Signal and Image Processing

3.00 Credits

Fundamentals of waves, wave interference, multiple beam interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction and transverse waves. Fourier transform techniques are used to describe light propagation through homogeneous media (lenses, gratings, holograms). Topics: scalar diffraction theory, the lens as a Fourier transforming element, coherent and incoherent imaging and holography.

EE 549: Parallel Programming for large-scale Computational Problems

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 550: Semiconductor Optoelectronics - Materials and Devices

3.00 Credits

This course will cover light generation, modulation and detection technologies. Main emphasis will be on semiconductor optoelectronic materials and devices. Basic principles of operation of lasers and detectors will be discussed. Polarization and absorption modulation of light based on ferroelectric and semiconductors materials will be described. A brief summary of potential applications to communications and sensing systems will be included.

EE 551: Method of Moments in Electromagnetics

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to provide senior/ rst year graduate students in electrical engineering (with specialization in Electromagnetic Theory) with numerical and computational skills and concepts to tackle electromagnetic wave phenomenon, radiation and scattering in the frequency domain.

EE 561: Random Signal Theory

3.00 Credits

Mathematical techniques for analysis and measurement of random signals and processes needed as a foundation for work in radar/sonar, communication theory, or detection, and estimation. Probability; random variables; correlation functions and power spectra stationarity, ergodicity; linear and nonlinear systems with random inputs. Prerequisite: MATH 309.

EE 563: Fundamentals of Acoustics

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 565: Information Security

3.00 Credits

Principles of Infosec, security planning, risk management, security technology, physical security, implementing information security, legal, ethical, and professional issues in infosec, security and personnel, information security maintenance etc. Prerequisite: Senior standing

EE 569: Computer Security and Privacy

3.00 Credits

Importance of computer security and its effect on individual privacy. Topics include computers and their impact on privacy, data banks, physical security, administrative security, and computer systems and network security. Not open to students who completed this course under earlier numbering (597). Prerequisite: Junior standing.

EE 572: Basics of Information Coding and Transmission

3.00 Credits

Introduces the basic notions of quantifying information content using entropy, and establishes lower bounds on file sizes for data compression. Covers commonly used compression methods (Huffman, Lempel-Ziv, etc). Introduces the notion of channel capacity for storage and transmission, and provides an introduction to error correction coding and its role in reliable transmission and storage over error-prone channels

EE 576: Introduction to Robotics

3.00 Credits

Covers basic concepts in robotics such as robot arm kinematics, robot arm dynamics, trajectory planning, and control. Transformation between joint space and Cartesian space. Coordinate frames and homogeneous coordinate transformation. Solution of inverse kinematic problem and robot workspace. Differential motion and manipulator Jacobian matrix. Introduction to the control problem of robot manipulators. Prerequisite: Senior Engineering or Graduate Students

EE 581: Cryptography and Steganography

3.00 Credits

Introductory concepts of cryptography and steganography; Classical and modern cryptographic algorithms - the underlying mathematics and analysis; Number theory; Cryptographic protocols in computer and data security applications; Fundamentals of information hiding - Techniques and applications.

EE 617: Adaptive Signal Processing

3.00 Credits

This course is concerned with the theory of adaptive signal processing. Topics include adaptive systems, adaptive linear combiner, theory of adaptation with stationary signals, searching the performance surface, LMS algorithm, z-Transform in adaptive signal processing, adaptive algorithms and structures, adaptive modeling and system identification, inverse adaptive modeling, deconvolution, and equalization, and adaptive interference canceling. This course is accompanied with MATLAB computer projects.

EE 618: Optimum Signal Processing

3.00 Credits

This course examines the properties of linear model, least-squares estimation (recursive and batch), Singular-Value Decomposition (SVD), Best Linear Unbiased Estimation (BLUE), likelihood, Maximum-Likelihood (ML) estimation, multivariate Gaussian random variables, mean-squares estimation of random parameters, Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) estimation of random parameters, Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. Practical applications will be emphasized with a number of hands on MATLAB Programming exercises.

EE 621: Fundamentals of Kalman Filtering and Smoothing

3.00 Credits

Lecture covers the basic problem of state estimation (prediction, Kalman filtering, smoothing), the steady-state Kalman filtering to the linearized variable model, and the state estimation for the "not-so-basic" state estimation. The state estimation also discussed for the nonlinear model. Computer projects. Prerequisite: EE561.

EE 625: System Optimization

3.00 Credits

Calculus of extrema. Variational calculus and continuous optimal control. The maximum principle and Hamilton-Jacobi theory. The linear regulator. The linear servomechanism. Euler-Lagrange equations. Discrete optimal control and mathematical programming. Optimal state estimation. The linear quadratic Gaussian problem. Prerequisite: EE 522.

EE 627: Neural Networks and Bioinformatics

3.00 Credits

Introduces basic concepts of neural networks using the general framework of parallel distributed processing. Deals with architecture, principles of operation, training algorithms and applications of a number of neural networks. Emphasizes designing networks from first principles to solve engineering problems. Application of neural networks to several engineering problems, including pattern classification, data and image compression, robotics, target tracking, and signal processing.

EE 628: Computational and Molecular Imaging

3.00 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive foundation of computational and molecular imaging and applications, recognizing the cross-disciplinary nature of the subject. It should be an informative exploration of tomographic imaging, image computation, and molecular characterization, with an emphasis on the strategic frontier between informatics and biomedicine.

EE 631: Broadband Integrated Services Digital Networks

3.00 Credits

Broadband services and principles of BISDN. BISDN architecture and protocol reference model. Functions of the BISDN layers: ATM and ATM Adaptation layers, physical layer for BISDN (cell based, SONET/SDH, FDDI and DWDM based). ATM switching. User-Network Interface specifications: physical and ATM layers specifications and Signaling for point-to-point, point-to multipoint and multipoint-to-multipoint connections. Congestion control, analytical and simulation modeling and performance evaluation. ATM switching, Wireless ATM. Applications: circuit and LAN Emulation, IP, Multiprotocal and MPLS over ATM. Prerequisite: EE 531 or equivalent

EE 634: Digital Image Processing

3.00 Credits

This course deals with the fundamentals of the major topics of digital image processing. The topics used in the course include the two-dimensional systems and mathematical preliminaries, image sampling and quantization, image transforms, stochastic models, image enhancement, filtering, restoration, reconstruction, and compression. This course is accompanied with computer projects. Prerequisite: Random Signal Theory, EE 561 or equivalent.

EE 642: Electo-Optics and Photonics

3.00 Credits

Introduces electro-optics, acousto-optics, magneto optics, and photonic switching. Covers the bulk electro-optic effect, with discussion of switching, phase and amplitude modulation, optical isolation and beam deflection applications. The Faraday effect and Faraday isolators, waveguide electro-optic effects, with application to switching, modulation, and computer logic circuits; the acousto optic effect, with application to switching, frequency modulation, beam deflection, and optical filtering; and principles of photonic switching.

EE 643: Photonic Communication Network Devices

3.00 Credits

Introduces the principles of operation for photonic communication devices. These include optical fibers, couplers, splitters, taps, isolators, circulators, attenuators, tunable filters, laser diodes, modulators/demodulators, photodetectors, lightwave amplifiers, wavelength converters/routers, wavelength division multiplexers/demultiplexers, optical add/drop multiplexers, optical switches, optical packet switches.

EE 644: Optical Communications

3.00 Credits

Introduction to Optical Communications. Optical sources and transmitters: Light Emitting Diodes (LED), Laser Diodes and modulation techniques. Optical fibers: waveguiding and signal degradations. Photodetectors: P-I-N and Avalanche Photodiodes. Optical receivers: Direct detection and coherent detection receivers. Optical components: connectors, splices, couplers, switches and wavelength division multiplexers. Transmission link design. Advanced systems. Prerequisite: EE 413 or equivalent.

EE 645: Optical Communication Networks

3.00 Credits

This course deals with building blocks, architectures, principle of operation and protocols of single and multiwavelength optical communication networks. More specifically, the following topics are to be covered: Principles of optical networks. Network resources: Network links, optical network nodes, network access stations, overlay processors, logical network processors and logical network overlays. Enabling technologies. Single wavelength networks: FDDI and SONET/SDH networks. Multiwavelength (DWDM) networks: Static networks, Wavelength routed networks, Linear lightwave networks, Logically routed networks. Survivability: protection and restoration. Management and control. Applications: IP, ATM, and SONET over Optical Transport Networks.

EE 646: Optical Internet

3.00 Credits

This course deals with the architecture and protocol stacks for transmission of TCP/IP over Optical Transport Networks (OTN). The protocols involved are: TCP/IP, Multi-protocol Label switching (MPLS) , Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM ), Point-to-point (PPP), HDLC, Frame Relay, Gigabit Ethernet, Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) and Optical Transport Network. Relevant functionalities and interaction among these protocol layers to the operation of optical internet are presented. Optimal architecture and protocol layers needed for optical internet is developed. The Integrated, Overlay and augmented architectures for TCP/IP/MPLS over OTN are presented. Technologies needed for implementation of an all-optical transport network is presented. Management and control of such networks are to be discussed. Survivability and availability models are presented. Effect of the reconfiguration time of OTN on the performance of optical internet is presented.

EE 647: Intelligent Broadband Multimedia Networks

3.00 Credits

This course deals with building blocks, architectures, examples and applications of intelligent broadband multimedia networks. Topics to be presented are: Basic intelligent network concepts, examples of types of intelligent networks, Global, advanced and future intelligent networks, Architecture of knowledge machines and knowledge Processing systems. Examples of intelligent networks: Network based educational systems, Integrated medical systems and PC based intelligent home networks. Social and cultural impact of intelligent broadband multimedia networks.

EE 652: Wireless Communications

3.00 Credits

Intended to give an introduction to wireless communications engineering. Includes characterization of the radio enviroment; link and system performances and the cellular concept. Study of the effect of the environment on the mobile systems and methods of mitigating degrading effects. Analysis of state-of-the-art wireless communication technologies and systems. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EE 656: Digital Communications

3.00 Credits

Fundamentals of digital data transmission. Performance analysis of basic digital modulation techniques. Detection of binary signals in AWGN. The matched filter and general formula for probability of error. BPSK, ASK, FSK modulations. Quadrature-multiplexed signaling schemes. Power spectra and probability of error of QPSK, OQPSK, MSK. Noncoherent digital modulation methods; FSK, DPSK. Signaling through band-limited channels. Designing for zero ISI: Nyquist's pulse-shaping criterion. Optimum transmitting and receiving filters. Duobinary signaling. Equalization in digital data transmission systems. Fundamentals of spread spectrum systems. Computer projects. Prerequisite: EE 561 or equivalent.

EE 657: Spread Spectrum Communications

3.00 Credits

Studies the foundations of Spread Spectrum Communications. Includes basic types of spread-spectrum modulation, generation of pseudo-noise sequences for the modulation/demodulation process, and synchronization between the transmitter and receiver. Investigates performance of spread spectrum systems in a noise or jamming environment. Considers application of spread spectrum communications to a common communication system including digital cellular telephones. Prerequisite: EE 656 or equivalent.

EE 659: Satellite Communications

3.00 Credits

This course deals with subsystems, operations and applications of satellite communication systems. Topics to be included are: Spacecraft subsystems: Telemetry,Tracking and Command subsystem, Communication subsystem, and Antennas. Satellite link design: uplink and downlink, effect of propagation impairments, examples.Efficient modulation and multiplexing techniques. Multiple access techniques: FDM/FM/FDMA, TDMA, CDMA and DAMA. Encoding for forward error correction: Linear block codes, Binary cyclic codes and convolutional codes. VSATs. Applications: satellite television, ATM over satellite. Prerequisite: EE 413 or equivalent.

EE 671: Statistical Signal Processing

3.00 Credits

Provides a rigorous foundation in detection and estimation theory. Binary hypothesis tests. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC). M hypotheses. Bayes estimation. Multiple parameter estimation. Maximum likelihood estimation. Composite hypotheses. Representation of random processes. Karhunen-Loeve transformation. Detection and estimation of signals. Computer projects. Prerequisite: EE 561.

EE 672: Error Control Coding

3.00 Credits

Introduction to Galois fields; linear codes and cyclic codes; BCH codes and their decoding procedures. An introduction to convolutional codes and decoding procedures. Practical applications of block codes and convolutional codes. Prerequisite: EE 561.

EE 710: Wavelet Theory and Applications

3.00 Credits

Introduces the basic concepts of time-scale processing as provided through wavelet analysis. Focuses on both the development and construction of orthogonal and biorthogonal wavelet filters for time-scale processing as well as issues related to their implementation. Compares wavelet analysis and standard Fourier techniques. Engineering applications include image processing, fractal waveform analysis, sonar processing, and noise reduction techniques. Includes computer simulation projects. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EE 712: Communication Theory

3.00 Credits

Optimum receiver design; theory and implementation. Analysis of waveform communication problems in terms of its vector equivalent. Signal set notation and analysis. Fundamental concepts involving the theoretical limits of communication system performance. Analysis of time, bandwidth, and dimensionality parameters. Channel capacity and reliability functions. Effect of quantization on communication system performance. Rudimentary concepts of information and its measure. Non-AWGN channel models. Prerequisite: EE 561 or equivalent.

EE 717: Advances in Adaptive Signal Processing

3.00 Credits

More recent advances in adaptive signal processing are explored, including higher-order statistic methods, nonlinear filter structures including Volterra and Bussgang filters, infinite impulse response (IIR) adaptive filters, and applications to medical imaging, wireless communications, and data analysis and forensics. The course will be project oriented, with students researching recent literature on a particular theme and developing adaptive signal processing algorithms tailored to the specific theme.

EE 725: Information Theory and Source Coding

3.00 Credits

Introduction to information theory from a communication system viewpoint. Source and channel encoding. Information measures for both continuous and discrete sources. The source coding theorem and channel coding systems developed. Practical methods of source and channel coding investigated. Prerequisite: EE 561.

EE 731: Computer Communication Networks

3.00 Credits

This course deals with analytical modeling and design of computer communication networks. Topics to be covered are: Delay models: Queueing models: Little's formula, M/M/1, M/M/m, M/M/?, M/M/m/K and M/G/1, MMPP, Fluid flow and fractal models and Network of Queues. Graph Theoretical models and routing algorithms:Bellman-Ford, Dijkstra"s and Floyd-Warshall algorithms. Multiaccess Communications: The ALOHA system, carrier sense, reservation, polling and splitting algorithms. Flow control: Window flow control, and rate control schemes, delay and loss analysis of audio and video multiplexers. Call admission control. Prerequisite: EE 531 or equivalent.

EE 740: Numerical Methods in Electromagnetics

3.00 Credits

Investigates modern techniques in computational electromagnetics. Emphasis on applying computational methods to practical applications such as microwave circuit analysis, scattering, radiation, and optics problems. Prerequisite: EE541

EE 741: Advanced Electromagnetic Scattering Phenomena

3.00 Credits

Time domain methods have several advantages over conventional frequency domain methods in the area of numerical electromagnetic solutions to scattering/radiation problems. For example, time domain methods work better for wide-band signature studies, are better suited for parallel and GPU processing. These methods are also provide better visual representations for understanding the field interactions. The material covered in this course includes direct solution of the domain integral equations using marching-on-time (MOT) methods, finite difference time domain method (FDTD), Transmission Line matrix (TLM) method, time domain finite element (TDFE) method, and time domain finite volume method (TDFV).

EE 742: Time Domain Electromagnetics

3.00 Credits

no description available

EE 746: Electromagnetic Radiation and Scattering

3.00 Credits

Provides an introduction to advanced electromagnetic theory with emphasis on radiation and scattering theory. Field equations derived for radiation and scattering problems and applied to simple antennas and bodies. Geometrical optics and geometrical theory of diffraction are presented for antenna problems, edge diffraction, and scattering from simple conducting bodies. Prerequisite: EE 541 or equivalent.

EE 771: Detection and Estimation Theory

3.00 Credits

Estimation of continuous waveforms. No-memory modulation system and modulation systems with memory. Multidimensional waveform estimation. Estimation of signals in colored noise. Linear estimation. Wiener and Kalman filters. Computer projects. Prerequisite: EE 671